Some Clean-Up Work: Why A Name Needs A Selector If One Is To Be Fully Explicit

Let me unpack a bit the NAME() selectors I have been using.  A selector such as NAME(‘Tom’) takes as an argument the string ‘Tom’ and returns the name Tom.(Tom is being mentioned here, not used.  The arguments surely have to be syntactic arguments.)  A string comprises 0 or more written characters (henceforth  just ‘characters’).  A character is an abstract object:  the character ‘e’, for example, can be instantiated by a blob of ink, a pencil mark, a set of pixels….  So a string is an abstract object comprising other abstract objects, and exists at one level-of-abstraction higher than they.

A string of characters is not itself a name, since a name can also be instantiated by a zero or more sounds.  I say “0 or more” because I can imagine a language that uses the glottal stop as a name, whatever the merely practical difficulties might be in doing so.  (A name that could never be pronounced by itself, but only within a stream of other sounds?)

(Perhaps — to jump back to characters for a moment — this language could write the name as ”.  So a name could be instantiated by strings comprising 0 or more characters. )

(Perhaps — to jump back to sounds for a moment — if I tried hard enough I could turn a sound into an abstract object (perhaps one sound can be instantiated by any number of configurations of sound waves?), but I will not try this at the moment. )

Instantiated, as I was saying, by either strings or sounds, a name is an abstract object, one existing at one level of abstraction higher than the abstract object STRING, which itself is one level of abstraction higher than the abstract object CHARACTER.   Not identical with either a sound or a string, a name is best represented not by, for example, ‘Tom’ or <<some sound>>, but by NAME(‘Tom’) or NAME(<<some representation of a string of sounds>>).

This, then, is why, when I am trying to be fully explicit, I refer to a name not as, e.g., ‘Tom’, but as NAME(‘Tom’).

Today’s homage to Plato’s SYMPOSIUM is Ashton Kutcher:

Ashton_Kutcher

There is too much beauty in the world.  How can one concentrate on anything at all with gods like this walking the earth?

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About Cliff Wirt

I am a banking DBA with various and sundry interests, including art, poetry, philosophy, music, languages, relational algebra, database administration, and blueberries. Don't forget the blueberries. Some of these interests tie in in surprising though usually tangential ways with database theory. Even the blueberries. I have published one article in a Philosophy Journal, and I have one painting in a corporate collection (housed in what used to be the Amoco building in Chicago). According to 12andMe, my paternal haplogroup is I2, my maternal H5. The Neanderthal percentage of my ancestry is 3%. My most famous ancestor is William Wirt (from whom I get my last name, though possibly not my Y chromosome), who defended the rights of the Cherokees before the Supreme Court, and ran for President in 1832, carrying one state. My homepage is at http://www.cliff-engel-wirt.com. My FaceBook page is at https://www.facebook.com/cliffengelwirt. My LinkedIn page is at https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4298877&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile_pic. View all posts by Cliff Wirt

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